Tachinomiya, or Standing Bars, Newest Rage in Japan

TachinomiyaTachinomiya, or standing bars, are bars in Japan that offer low cost drinks but no seats. They are designed for a quick drink on your way home from work. An interesting concepts as they are becoming popular in Japan, but growing up in New York, Penn Station and Grand Central Stations were full of tachinomiya. They just were never called a fancy name beside bar.

IN Tokyo, where cafe floor space is at a premium, some bars are abolishing tables and chairs altogether and stacking customers vertically along a bar.
They are known as tachinomiya, or standing bars, and they are sweeping Tokyo. Their popularity is fueled by low prices and the opportunities they offer many young, shy Japanese to mix and mingle with whoever is standing next to them.
“It’s easy to go in, easy to go out,” said Sachiko Tabata, who was sipping and snacking with another young woman at a new bar in Shinbashi called Gohiikini, or Nice to Meet You (2-8-9 Shinbashi Minato-ku; 81-3-3502-3132; www.3cs.co.jp). Standing at one end of a polished wood bar, they were discussing their reactions to the movie “Sayuri,” known in the United States as “Memoirs of a Geisha.”
Generally found close to Tokyo’s major commuter rail stations and open from 4 . to 11 p.m., tachinomiya are ideal for an end-of-the-day stop. A visitor can sip a glass of imported wine, nibble on tapas and rub shoulders at the bar. Many of the tachinomiya are literally holes in the wall. But some, like Gohiikini, have Web sites with maps that can be printed out for an evening of hashigo or bar hopping. via the New York Times.

More on Tachinomiya from Japan Today

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